Systems and lubrication

Reliable operation of machines mainly depends not only on the lubricant selected but also on its method of application. Lubricants previously were applied by hand, however contemporary machines requires exact methods that can be precisely regulated. For the majority of equipment, different techniques of lubrication and kinds of lubes should be employed for various parts. In a vehicle, for example, the framework is oiled with grease, the manual transmission and rear-axle real estates are fulled of heavy oil, the automatic transmission is oiled with a special-grade light oil, wheel bearings are packed with a grease that has actually a thickener composed of long fibers, and the crankcase oil that lubricates engine parts is a lightweight, free-flowing oil.
Application of Liquid Lubricants

Wick-feed oilers are put under moving parts, and by pushing against them they feed oil by capillary action. Horizontal bearings are frequently oiled by a turning ring or chain that holds oil from a reservoir in the bearing real estate and distributes it along the bearing through networks or grooves. Central oiling systems normally consist of a tank, pump, and tubes with which oil is circulated, while heaters or coolers could be introduced to alter the viscosity of the lubricating substance for different parts of the system.
Application of Semisolid and Solid Lubricants

Grease is a blend of a thickener and a lube; frequently it is made from a mineral oil and a soap. Solid lubricants are particularly helpful at low and high temperature levels, in high vacuums, and in other applications where oil is not ideal; common solid lubricants are graphite and molybdenum disulfide.

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In an auto, for example, the chassis is oiled with grease, the manual transmission and rear-axle real estates are filled with heavy oil, the automatic transmission is lubricated with a special-grade light oil, wheel bearings are packed with a grease that has actually a thickener composed of long fibers, and the crankcase oil that oils engine parts is a lightweight, free-flowing oil.
Horizontal bearings are regularly oiled by a turning ring or chain that carries oil from a reservoir in the bearing housing and distributes it along the bearing through grooves or networks. Strong lubricants are specifically beneficial at high and reduced temperature levels, in high vacuums, and in various other applications where oil is not ideal; usual solid lubricating substances are graphite and molybdenum disulfide.

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